Fictional Forests: Why They Enchant Us

forest

“Only with a leaf can I talk of the forest.” ― Visar Zhiti

Forests, in literature, can mean many, many things. Adventure, escape, danger, evil, magic, temptation, mystery, freedom, death, life, or shelter. Depending on the story, the setting, the characters, the author, or even the reader’s interpretation – a wood can be seen in endless lights.

No matter what a forest says to us, it’s hard to deny the enchantment that is cast on a reader when an author uses such a place to good effect. A murky wood, or a sunny glade, can come alive in a well-told story. They can almost become a character itself within the tale. A wood told of by one storyteller may be a place of darkness and fear, while the same wood in the hands of another may come alive with hope and safety.

A forest itself is changeful and moody – try walking in it from one week to the next in the springtime and you’ll find it a different place each time. Vines curl, flowers grow, trees fall, animals build and burrow, life pulses in every hushed inch of it.

“You could almost feel the trees drinking the water up with their roots. This wood was very much alive.” – C.S. Lewis

woodbetweentheworldsSo, what is it that is so potent about the forests we all love in well-known fairy tales and fantasies? What is it that remains in our imaginations years after the stories have been put back on the shelf? For each of us, that answer is different.

Whether we are reading about a band of merry outlaws, a headless horseman, a red-capped girl traveling to visit her grandmother – whether we are watching Puck and Oberon make mischief, or envisioning a boy with a lightening scar running from a dark specter – we are entranced. We are drawn in. And what’s more, we remember, long after the pages are closed and our lives have moved on.

Some of my personal favorites are listed below. But I’m eager to know which books and stories involving forests have influenced you the most, and for what reasons. Please share!

1. Green Darkness by Anya Setontreebeard
2. The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien
3. Treasure at the Heart of the Tanglewood by Meredith Ann Pierce
4. Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak
5. The Magician’s Nephew by C.S. Lewis
6. What Lies on the Other Side by Udo Weigelt
7. Guenevere Trilogy by Rosalind Miles
8. Harry Potter Series by J.K. Rowling

Be sure to watch for my next post about real-life forests that have inspired famous stories!

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About bookishashlee

Ashlee is the author of The Word Changers, a Christian YA fantasy that released June 2014.

Posted on May 6, 2014, in Books, fairy tales, fantasy, Forests and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 4 Comments.

  1. I’m trying to think of a fantasy series I’ve read that doesn’t involve some kind of awesome/creepy/otherwise significant forest. I guess there are a few, but not many.
    Probably the most influential ones are The Hobbit (with Mirkwood Forest), which is part of what made me fall in love with fantasy, and The Tales of Goldstone Wood (the Wood, obviously), which is pretty much even with LOTR for Favorite Series.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Allison Ruvidich

    Love this post! I have been blessed to have lived my entire life in the middle of a forest, and it certainly bleeds through into many aspects of my creativity. I agree with Sara; the Wood Between is my favorite fictional forest, although I am terribly fond of J. K. Rowling’s Forbidden Forest. (That’s what my family calls our woods.)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Oooh, Allison, I’m quite jealous! My dream is to live in the middle of a forest one day. In the meantime I take as many forest walks as possible, and it’s such a source of peace and inspiration to me! I’m quite fond of the Forbidden Forest myself 😉 Thanks so much for stopping by!

      Like

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