Book Blurb Blues

I’ve been in the process of writing and polishing the back cover description for my upcoming novella. And I’ll tell you the truth – it’s not fun at all. I keep wanting to shout, “But I’m a book writer, not a blurb writer! I’m good at unraveling my story over the long haul, not condensing all of it into a tight little space!”

I think it comes down to a few specific things that should be included. Here’s my very amateur go at it. Ready?

Setting: Things need to be mentioned in the blurb that give the reader an idea of where this story takes place and what open bookthey are walking into. Whatever these end up being – certain qualities/people/creatures/props – they should be given a nod in order to create a sense of setting. Many of these depend on the genre. Fantasy more so than most, I think.

Characters: Ok, no-brainer. The main character has to be introduced, along with any other character who is important to the plot as a whole. Maybe even the antagonist. After all, books are about people first and foremost, right?

Goals: More than just mentioning the main character, we have to know what she desires. What is the crux of her journey, whether it’s a physical, spiritual or emotional one? I want to know up front that this girl has something driving her forward. Otherwise I’ll suspect that I’m in for a yawn-worthy read.

Complication: Is there a person or circumstance that is thwarting her from her goal? Well, we need to know about that too. A little bit. Don’t give too much away, though. The reader will want to hear about it, certainly; otherwise, why open the book at all? But I personally have difficulty with this one. How much to tell without giving too much away and ruining important surprises, but making it enough that it creates curiosity in the reader? It’s a very fine line, my friend.

Stakes: What is at risk if the main character doesn’t (or perhaps does!) obtain what she wants? Will she lose her life? Her family? Her self-respect? Her cat? All of the above? Whatever the stakes are, a blurb-reader wants to know them up front. Or at least I always do. It puts that extra fire in me that says, “I just have to know what happens!!”

Hope: So the poor main character has been given an ultimatum, a timeframe to achieve something, a roadblock that is seemingly impassable. What now? Well again, a simple blurb can’t give too much away. But we at least need to see that glimmer – that small flash of hope that tells us things might be … could be … all right.

Brevity: Ah, brevity, my bane. It’s like trying to fit my post-baby self into the size 4 jeans I wore a few short years ago. Not likely. I need a serious word diet to get the 25,000 words of my novella into a 200-word blurb. It’s painful, I’m not gonna lie. It takes lots of trimmings and re-writes. Lots.

So …. aaallll these things need to fit into a blurb? Yep. Ok, well, most of them. Some of them can be accomplished with a few very choice words. Some of them, such as setting, can be almost implied between the lines without ever mentioning directly at all.

Yep, I’ve got my work cut out for me.

So what are the things that draw you in when you read a book blurb? What is most likely to get you to pick up a book and say, “I have to take this home and read it right now!”

Advertisements

About bookishashlee

Ashlee is the author of The Word Changers, a Christian YA fantasy that released June 2014.

Posted on May 1, 2015, in Publishing, writing and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 9 Comments.

  1. It is sometimes ridiculously hard to come up with a blurb. Who knew that writing something so short could require so much effort? lol! Maybe someday I’ll get it right. 🙂 Good luck!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. This is such a nice, concise breakdown of what goes into a blurb – thank you for writing it out!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks 🙂 I think I wrote it for myself more than anything else, just because I wanted to lay out the things I knew I had to include in some way. Then I thought, “oh, blog post!” Haha. Glad it helps someone other than me!!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I personally love it when the blurb ends with a dash question. So… Allison must think of some way to conclude this comment– but will it be worth the word count? ; D

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Oh my. What an in-depth post! Thanks for this, Ashlee! 🙂 Sometimes I try to write a blurb before I actually WRITE the story, which can help, though it normally takes tweaking afterward… 😉 But at least it’s a start, right? 😛 Best of luck on conquering the blurb-beast! You can do it! 😀 (And I’ll very much look forward to hearing it when it’s completed!!)

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Sounds like you have a pretty good handle on what all needs to go into a blurb, but I can completely empathize — it’s hard!! If you want an extra opinion regarding the blurb, feel free to email me. I’d love to help you since you helped me. 🙂

    -Tialla

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Blurbs are possibly my least favorite thing about writing novels… thank you for this post, it is very helpful. I think brief, action-packed blurbs draw me in the most. If the blurb is overly wordy or complicated-sounding, I’ll probably pass it over. I don’t mind if the story itself is complicated, complex, and filled with twists and turns, I prefer that… but I like the blurb to be a straight-forward, “This is what this story is about” sort of thing.

    Good luck on your blurb-writing! I will be tackling that monster in the near future, as well.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: